wildlife surveys

Reports galore.....

 

We have a growing library of survey reports, containing information about the wildland project and the ecology and wildlife at Knepp. See below for a list of those we have posted on this website, and click on the link to read the full report. We will add to this list as new reports become available. 

List of Surveys and reports 

2011
Knepp 2011 Monitoring Reports

Shoreham District Ornithological Society News Letter

Survey 2011

2010

Knepp 2010 Monitoring Reports  

Survey 2010

2009

Knepp 2009 Monitoring Reports  

Survey 2009 

New Constructions of Nature in Conservation Biology, 

This dissertation explores Knepp's re wilding project through discussions with locals and the Knepp team. Dissertation 2009

2008

Knepp 2008 Monitoring Reports  

Survey 2008  

Floodplain Woodland on Knepp  

Survey 2008 - two surveys on Charlwood Wood and Hartsgravel

Waxcaps and other fungi  

Interesting results of a preliminary fungus survey of the unimproved grassland of the Castle lawns.

2007

Monitoring Strategy for Knepp Castle Estate Wildland Project  

changes in management mean changes in our wildlife. This report sets out a programme of survey work aimed at monitoring how the wildlife responds to a more natural environment.

Feasibility Assessment  

An holistic management plan for a naturalistic grazing project on the Knepp Estate.

Creating Naturalistic Grazing in Lowland England  

An assessment of the issues that would need to be addressed in order to further the implementation of naturalistic grazing in lowland England. Produced by Kernon Countryside Consultants and Land Use Consultants.  

2006

River Adur Restoration and Enhancement Report  

Detailed report by the River Restoration Centre covering all aspects of the restoration of the River Adur through Knepp to its natural course and re-connection with its floodplain.

Knepp Mill Pond sediment Study Proposal  

Outline of a multi-disciplinary proposal to explore the interaction between climate, pollution, land use and agricultural change as a vital component in the interpretation of past and future environmental change.  

Small Mammals 

Survey 2008 An executive summary of a survey carried out by James Goodrum -  live trapping small mammals as a tool for observing landscape-scale changes on a re-wilding area, Knepp Castle Estate. 

2005

Knepp Castle Estate Baseline Ecological Survey

Survey 2005 published by English Nature, this report provides information on the vegetation and wildlife of the Knepp Estate at the outset of the Wildland project and the introduction of our new strategy of meat-production.  

2000

Colson and Stone Restoration Management Plan 

Main Report 2000. 

NOTE:  If you are interested in wildland follow this link to further papers and articles.

See also the future monitoring strategy for Knepp Castle Estate Wildland Project

 

 

Knepp Castle Estate 

Baseline Ecological Survey

2005

by 

Theresa E. Greenaway

Record Centre Survey Unit,

Sussex Biodiversity Record Centre,

 Woods Mill, Henfield,

   West Sussex RH14 0UE  

For English Nature Research Reports

(Abbreviated)

For the full Natural England base line survey click on this link:-

http://www.english-nature.org.uk/pubs/publication/PDF/693.pdf.

 

 

Click Here for baseline survey report menu

 the full report can be ordered from Natural England 

Report number 693

BACK TO THE TOP Knepp Castle Estate Baseline Ecological Survey
 

 

Monitoring Strategy for Knepp Castle Estate Wildland Project  

2007

by 

Theresa E. Greenaway

Introduction The main aim of the Knepp Castle Estate Wildland Project is to put most of the Estate’s 3500 acres under as natural a grazing regime as possible, following a staged reversion from largely arable use since 2001 to the present and ongoing. The facilitation of natural processes is seen as the underlying rationale behind this aim.

 

Click Here for word document 

158 KB

BACK TO THE TOP  Monitoring Strategy for Knepp Castle Estate Wildland Project  
 

Barn Owls & Herons (By Barrie Watson)

2005 Report 

25 Barn owl nest boxes have been placed in some of the barns and on trees on the estate, and up to two pairs of this scarce and specially protected bird nest in most years.  The boxes are monitored (under English Nature license) and thirty seven chicks and four adults have been ringed. At one site there was a new adult female in 1998, 2002 and 2005, and it must be presumed that in each case the previous female had died or been killed. The incumbent in 2005 was 2-year old bird originally ringed as a chick near Partridge Green. One of the 1998 chicks was found dead at Portsmouth in February 1999, and a chick ringed in 2004 was found as the male of a pair nesting at Wiston in 2005. 

2005 was a particularly good year for Barn owls, with two pairs at Knepp. The eggs of one female were predated, but she laid again producing three young. The other pair had six young.   

We are sorry to learn that nationally it was not been a great year for barn owls in 2006.  The Barn Owl Trust report that a cold March & a wet May caused numbers to drop by 75% nationally. Of the 2 sites on Knepp that are monitored by Dr Barrie Watson 5 chicks have or are about to fledge, so not a complete catastrophe.  Perhaps the abundance of habitat at our barn owl sites has helped us beat the national situation.

It is hoped that the management changes on the estate will result in more good hunting habitat, so that the Barn owls continue to do well.  

(see the results of the 2007 barn owls ringing)

(see more pictures - click here - 12 KB)

Heronry counts at Knepp  

There is a heronry in trees beside the Kneppmill pond. Since it was first noticed in 1975 the number of nests has been counted each year for the Sussex Bird Report and for the national Heronries Census run by the British Trust for Ornithology. Counts over the ten years to 2005 have ranged between 11 and 18 nests, with an average of 13.

The first national census of heronries in Britain was made in 1928 and has been repeated regularly ever since. It is probably the longest such run of biological information in the world.  

(Click here for the British Trust for Ornithology web site)

 

John Crix and Barrie Watson ringing  Knepp Barn Owls

BACK TO THE TOP   Barn Owls & Herons
11
 

Study Proposal

F. Gathorne-Hardy 

S. Brooks 

P. C. Buckland

 

Late Holocene Environmental Change in N Sussex: a proposal for multidisciplinary study of the lake at Knepp Castle

Introduction

The interaction between climate, pollution, land use and agricultural change is a vital component in the interpretation of past and future environmental change.  Whilst each site is unique in what it inherits from the past, integrated multidisciplinary studies provide key tools in understanding local changes, and building models which are applicable on a regional if not international basis.

What are required are more studies where the historical record is sufficiently precise to enable correlation between events evident in the palaeoecological record and documentary sources.  In south-east England there are few sites where a continuous sedimentary record for the past 500 years is available and there has been little attempt to study a period wherein the historical record is deemed sufficient.

(click here for full Study Proposal - 74 KB)

 

Looking for midge heads and 

Diatoms

 

BACK TO THE TOP Study Proposal
1
 

 

SURVEY OF FLOODPLAIN WOODLAND 

IN CHARLWOOD WOOD 

and 

HARTSGRAVEL AREAS

by 

Neil A Sanderson

 

Survey Date 15/05/2008

 

 

Click Here  Charlwood wood

hartsgravel wood

Click Here  Hartsgravel wood

 

BACK TO THE TOP floodplain survey
1
 

 

Knepp 2008 

Monitoring Reports

Compiled By

Theresa Greenaway

 

 

wood lark found on Knepp

Click Here for Knepp 2008 monitoring reports

BACK TO THE TOP floodplain survey
1
 

River Adur Restoration and Enhancement Report

 

 

by The River Restoration Centre

Martin Janes

The River Restoration Centre is a not-for-profit information and advice centre, providing nonconsultancy services to the UK statutory environment agencies, river managers, land owners, practitioners and interest groups

Knepp Castle Estate is keen to maximise the biodiversity potential of the whole estate. Through discussions with Defra the estate will be entering the Adur and its floodplain into a Countryside Stewardship scheme. The reach to be entered is approx. 2.2km, with two main tributaries and their floodplains adding to the extent of land to be considered.

Various options for habitat enhancement and increasing biodiversity are apparent, from rewetting by the use of sluice boards to restoration of the old course of the Adur.

River Adur Floodplain Restoration 

Pre-feasibility study of river restoration

(click here for report - PDF 3097 KB)

 

River Adur flooding the moat around the Knepp Ruin - the river was canalled at some stage in its past

BACK TO THE TOP River Adur Restoration and Enhancement Report
1
   

Waxcaps (and others) on the front lawn at Knepp

These are some of the fungi that Ted Green, Jill Butler and Peter Marren identified on the lawn in front of the house. The waxcaps need to have undisturbed short grass for about 100 years to be fruiting like this.

Peter Marren's List on the 9th Oct 2006

  1. Golden Waxcap, Hygrocybe chlorophana - yellow

  2. Snowy Waxcap, H. virginea - white

  3. Fibrous Waxcap, H. intermedia (the rarest of them) - orange

  4. Scarlet Waxcap, H. coccinea - red

  5. Parrot Waxcap, H. psittacina - green, going orange, then yellow

  6. Slimy Waxcap, H.irrigata (=H.unguninosa) - grey & slimy

  7. The tiny orange one I mistakenly called Rickenella fibula was yet another waxcap, possibly Goblet Waxcap, H. cantharella

  8. The yellow 'fairy clubs' were - Yellow Club, Clavulinopsis helvola

  9. Golden Spindles, C. fusiformis (the bigger one)

  10. Lilac Fibrecap, Inocybe geophylla (lilac)

  11. Red Cracking Bolete, Boletus chrysenteron

  12. The Blusher, Amanita rubescens

  13. Brown Roll-rim, Paxillus involutus (at base of the cedar)

  14. A milkcap, Lactarius species

  15. Fibrous Waxcap, Hygrocybe intermedia

  16. Hygrocybe russocoriacea

 

(click here for a page of Wax Caps - 13 KB)

 

 

BACK TO THE TOP Waxcaps (and others) on the front lawn at Knepp
 

 

 An holistic management plan

for a naturalistic grazing project 

on the Knepp Estate.

Feasibility Assessment

March 2007

A report by:

Kernon Countryside Consultants

and Land Use Consultants

 

 

Click Here for PDF document 2,671 KB

(Note this is a large file and may take several minutes to down load)

 

BACK TO THE TOP Feasibility Assessment
 

 

Creating Naturalistic Grazing

In

Lowland England

RESEARCH NOTE

April 2007

A report by:

Kernon Countryside Consultants

and Land Use Consultants

 

 

Click Here for PDF document 

 

BACK TO THE TOP Creating Naturalistic Grazing
 

 

Small Mammals

Live trapping small mammals as a tool for 

observing landscape-scale changes 

on the Knepp re-wilding area

May 2008

A report by:

James Goodrum

 

 

Click Here for MS word document (327 KB)

 

BACK TO THE TOP small mammals
 

 

KNEPP CASTLE DEER PARK

W E S T  G R I N S T E A D, W E S T  S U S S E X

Restoration Management Plan

May 2000

COLSON STONE

P R A C T I C E

 

Click Here for the report without maps and colour images MS word doc 299KB

Click here for the full colour report can be down loaded but it is a huge PDF file 90 MB 

 

BACK TO THE TOP colson stone report
 

New Constructions of Nature in Conservation Biology 

This dissertation explores Knepp's re wilding project through discussions with locals and the Knepp team. 

Dissertation 2009

by Ruth Swift

Click Here for this interesting dissertation

 

BACK TO THE TOP New Constructions